How can we improve the Microsoft Edge developer experience?

MathML

An application of XML for describing mathematical notations and capturing both its structure and content.

http://www.w3.org/TR/MathML3/
http://docs.webplatform.org/wiki/mathml

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    Jonathan Sampson [MSFT]Jonathan Sampson [MSFT] shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    26 comments

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      • Alice WonderAlice Wonder commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        MathML support is very important. MathJAX does not work well when viewing content off-line.

      • Johann DirryJohann Dirry commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        some of the biggest educational sites on the web, like Wikipedia and Wolfram Alpha can heavily profit from such an implementation. Not to mention countless online learning sites and communuties, for whom math is essential to communicate big ideas.

        Workarounds like MathJAX work in many cases, but are often very limiting. Especially when trying to do interactive mathematics, or providing math in a format that can be understood by screenreaders.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        MathML support is VERY IMPORTANT! MS can best Google Chrome if Edge does
        provide native html5 support which includes both MathML and SVG

      • GentGent commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        +1 and several thousands of students in Sweden using web based educational sites and publications.

      • EmanueleEmanuele commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I agree this idea. Many university courses use this annotation so many students prefer setting Firefox or Chrome as main browser, where MathML works very well

      • Y ZhangY Zhang commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        mathematical features in a web page is essential to our daily lives. a good browser shall support mathml.

      • Beni Cherniavsky-PaskinBeni Cherniavsky-Paskin commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Until this is actually implemented, please at least support img/svg fallbacks via `alttext` attribute and `sematics > annotation-xml` tags:
        https://connect.microsoft.com/IE/feedback/details/812595/add-some-css-rules-to-select-mathml-annotations-and-alttext

        Currently IE would display such fallbacks but would ALSO display (badly laid out) fragments inside the math. All that's needed is an ability to hide the math when a fallback is provided, which is implementable with a small addition to the user agent stylesheet.
        (And we can't simply put the same stylesheet in pages because that would hide MathML even in browsers that can render it. It has to come from each browser so that it can be retracted when real MathML support lands. Yes, it's possible to detect support in JS [1] but there is value in being able to author sematically correct JS-free content, never touch it again and have it still work in 10 years...)

        [1] http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4827044/how-to-detect-mathml-tag-support-mfrac-mtable-from-javascript

      • Sina BahramSina Bahram commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        It is critical to so many users, especially those with disabilities, for Edge to support MathML. With the advent of proper MathML support in various assistive technologies, we are finally living in a time when only the browser is now most responsible for denying access to the world's mathematics. Microsoft, I urge you not to be this last obstacle, please.

      • JayJay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        It really is time to add support for MathML. It's mature and standardized, it has a large potential user base (think of all these scientists, teachers, students etc.) and would actually provide value to your customers (more value than the n-th UX redesign) and become an (almost) unique selling proposition for IE.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I hope Spartan's new add-in model allows us to implement MathML support using code from our MathPlayer add-in for IE, which has not been allowed to run since IE9, except in Enterprise Mode.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Stefan: You probably know that, but Wikipedia has introduced a MathML mode https://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/mediawiki-l/2014-October/043482.html

        As indicated on Murray Sargent's blog below, Internet Explorer uses LineServices and so could reuse Microsoft Office's good math layout. It's really a pity that the LineServices math mode is currently disabled and that people prefer to suggest https://wpdev.uservoice.com/forums/257854-internet-explorer-platform/suggestions/6509416-use-blink-or-other-open-rendering-engine-and-sta as an "improvement" to IE.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Somehow there's a disconnect with the education, accessibility, publishing, engineering, and scientific communities. They all want MathML support but browser makers like Microsoft all say they don't get much request for it. Now that people can vote for it, perhaps Microsoft will listen.

      • StefanStefan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Firefox's support of MathML continues to set the highest standard, and Safari continues to improve its support. Only Chrome, in an apparent snub to the scientific community, ditched it -- apparently they don't think that mathematics notation is as important as the countless superficial features they continue to load on their browser. Without MathML, all developers who try to include math in their Web pages are generally lost and faced with no easy choices (the only option seems to be loading on MathJax with its massive Javascript overhead, slowness, and asynchronous nature that causes major headaches for developers- in my own case I personally cannot use it as my interactive tutorials rely heavily on synchronous typesetting in the code). Even Wikipedia resorts to images instead of typeset equations -- this in the twenty-first century in an advanced technological society. Once Microsoft takes the initiative and makes MathML native in IE, Google will be obliged to follow suit, and mathematics notation - already an important part of education and everyone's Web experience - will finally be a part of html.

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